Tiger, Tiger: A Memoir

Some time ago I found myself sitting in a doctor’s office, waiting. I’m sure there exist places that are more boring, but honest to god I can’t think of any. Even the magazines lying around are about as exiting as watching paint dry. Nonetheless, I picked up one of those ladies magazines full of recepies, romance novels and Dear Abby columns. My eye caught a small article about Margaux Fragoso. I had never heard about her, but apparently she is a woman who was abused as a child and now have written a book about her childhood. Judging from the short article the book had caused a lot of debate. Most things relating to pedophilia have a way of doing so. Back home I googled the book and got still more curious, so I ended up buying the Kindle edition and have now read it. I am talking about the book ”Tiger, Tiger. A Memoir”. I have spent a few days coming to grips with my feelings about the book and whether I should try to write a review of sorts. I am myself a gay male and thus I belong to an erotic minority. Oh, just to set the record straight (this shouldn’t be necessary but apparently it is), being gay isn’t another word for being pedophile, despite what some imbeciles like to state. But being from an erotic minority myself it feels more than a little hypocritical to condemn another erotic minority. At least if one, as I do, believe that we are born with our sexualities. So, can you write about pedophilia without bringing out the usual rhetoric of cut of their balls and feed ‘em to the lions? In fact you can. It you have talent. I don’t, but Margaux Fragoso has. The book is, as its title reveals, a memoir. It’s the story about the relationship between Margaux who at age seven meets the 51 year old Peter Curran. The two of them spend 15 years as friends, lovers, abusee and abuser, adult and child – and finally adult and adult. It takes the suicide of Peter to end the relationship and allow Margaux to start her adult life for real. No spoiler here as this is known from the start of the book. The truly chilling thing about the book is the way Margaux Fragoso refrains from portraying Peter as the proverbial boogeyman. Instead she portrays a man caught up in the tragedy of his own sexuality, and the methods Peter use to deceive himself and Margaux about the true nature of their relationship. Margaux Fragoso describes the development of a friendship, albeit a terribly skewed one, where the adult’s sexuality invades the...